• I would love to do a tour on horseback. Maybe when you're here! And buy some fleur de sel, of course.

  • Anonymous

    Can't wait for the salt marsh report!

  • Next time I am in Probence, I would love to get to there! I am one of the aforementioned salt-aholics and would love to see firsthand where one of my favorite salts comes from! And I already have the boots and hat!! ~ David

  • I remember going to the Camargue with my parents when I was a little girl, it was as magical as you portray it. I hope to return ther some day.

  • Hi Pam, I will bring my boots! let's get some of the riz rouge, too!

  • When I post my piece about Aigues-Mortes and its neighboring salt marshes next week, friend and fellow blogger, David of Cocoa & Lavender, will post an article about salt, in general, including a wonderful recipe with, of course, a lot of salt! He is, as he wrote below, a salt-aholic!

  • I foresee a team of cowboys and cowgirls, traversing the Camargue to photograph the wildlife and beautiful landscape, while gathering salt and red rice!

  • Hi Lisa,
    I wonder what changes you would see now. I bet it was even more sauvage then…not to suggest that your childhood was so long ago! 🙂

  • Anonymous

    Susan,Ithink I get a good portion of my education from your blogs !! They are so beautifully written..How many people know how the Flamingos get their pink color, or that horses turn from dark brown to white. The Carmague seems to be a magical place. Thebulls are majestic and the figs succulent.
    I do believe you have enough material to write a book. May I be the first to request an autographed copy?

  • I would love to write a book on my favorite things in Provence–markets, lavender, rosé, and my favorite places to visit!
    I, too, found it very interesting that the color of the flamingos stems from an algae for which we humans pay a lot of money to get the antioxidant effects!
    Thanks for your nice comments!

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